Switzerland First in Ranking of Top 10 Most Blockchain-Friendly Countries in Europe

BlockShow’s rankings of the best European countries for opening a blockchain company puts Switzerland at the top of the list.

Switzerland is ranked number one in a list of the top ten European countries for starting a blockchain company, according to a study released by blockchain conference BlockShow Europe 2018.

In the list of best countries for starting a blockchain company, Gibraltar and Malta follow Switzerland in second and third respectively. The study consisted of 48 European countries that were examined for rankings by Initial Coin Offering (ICO) regulations, regulations on crypto as a payment service, and taxation frameworks for crypto.

Switzerland is known as a crypto-friendly nation due to both its establishment of a virtual currency hub, “crypto valley,” in Zug and its status as a tax-free haven for crypto investors. Gibraltar has reportedly attracted 200 ICOs before the planned launch of its Gibraltar Blockchain Exchange (GBX), and Malta, the “blockchain island,” has welcomed major crypto exchanges Binance and OKEx recently.

BlockShow also released a poll this week on blockchain-based app Polys that allows users to vote on the leading women and companies in the EU blockchain space. The winners of the poll will be announced during the BlockShow conference at the end of this month in Berlin.

At the beginning of February, the European Commission announced the launch of the EU Blockchain Observatory and Forum as part of their aim to unite the economy around blockchain. However, more recently, newly approved EU privacy laws – which come into effect on May 25 – arguably conflict with the decentralized nature of blockchain technology.

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Bitcoin Legitimized in EU Following New KYC Regulations

Bitcoin is set to find new legitimacy in the European Union as member states agreed to force cryptocurrency exchanges within its jurisdiction to collect identification data on their users in an effort to prevent money laundering.  Legitimizing Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency in the EU Both cryptocurrency exchanges and online wallets operating in the European Union’s jurisdiction are now required to carry out the exact same know-your-customer (KYC) checks as traditional banks. The regulatory move comes as the

The post Bitcoin Legitimized in EU Following New KYC Regulations appeared first on Bitcoinist.com.

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European Central Bank’s Mersch Says Banks Should ‘Segregate’ Crypto Trading

The European Central Bank’s Yves Mersch stated that banks should “segregate” their dealings in cryptocurrencies from other activities, saying crypto doesn’t “qualify” as money

European Central Bank (ECB) board member Yves Mersch has said that banks should “segregate” their dealings in cryptocurrencies from other activities, Reuters reported May 14.

Reuters quotes Mersch as raising concerns over the high volatility of crypto markets, emphasizing that digital tokens “do not qualify as money,” and that their issuers, as well as dealers, exchanges, banks, or clearing houses, should be regulated.

Mersch reportedly noted that even at its peak market capitalization in January 2018 –  which Mersch mistakenly reports as $432 bln rather than the actual $800 bln – the crypto market is still too small to threaten financial stability. He said however that if cryptocurrencies were to be used as collateral for bank loans or for settling trades at clearing houses, there would be an argument for such activities being “ring-fenced” from other trading and investments.

As Reuters notes, the European banks regulated by ECB are not currently dealing in crypto. In the US, investment banking giant Goldman Sachs recently announced it would be opening a crypto trading desk “within weeks.”

ECB’s Yves Mersch has been a staunch critic of the increasing interconnection of the traditional financial sector with the cryptocurrency space, saying that cryptocurrencies pose a risk of “contagion and contamination of the existing financial system” in February this year.

Notwithstanding Mersch’s concerns – that are shared by others such as the Bank of International Settlements’ (BIS) Augustín Carstens – the ECB’s Chair of the Supervisory Board Daniele Nouy told CNBC in February that future involvement of the ECB in cryptocurrency regulation was likely to be “very, very low”.

In March, ECB and BIS issued a statement on Bitcoin, as well as central bank-issued digital currencies (CBDCs), saying they are “not the answer to the cashless economy.”

ECB has however championed blockchain’s potential for transforming securities settlements, against the backdrop of the European Commission’s Blockchain Observatory, which aims at “uniting” the European economy around the technology.

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